Prisoner abuse

Prisoner abuse is the mistreatment of persons while they are under arrest or incarcerated, therefore deprived of the right of self-defense against acting authorities and generally defenseless in actual fact.

Abuse falling into this category includes:

Psychological abuse[edit]

White noise[edit]

The endless playing of random static (similar to that of unused TV frequencies) with no pattern; this can cause extreme discomfort and disorientation.

Verbal abuse[edit]

Prisoners may be subject to taunting, heckling, profanity, and malicious lies by prison authorities. Guards and other authorities may use verbal abuse as a means of frightening or demoralizing prisoners to make them more compliant, or simply out of sadism.

Enablement of sexual violence[edit]

Prisoners are sometimes intentionally housed with inmates known to have raped other prisoners, or protection from known rapists may be purposely withheld from the prisoners. These practices create a very high incidence of rape in US prisons, which was the topic of the 2001 report No Escape from Human Rights Watch.[6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Standing Up Against Sexual Assault By the State". American Civil Liberties Union. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  2. ^ Neil A. Lewis (2005-01-01). "Fresh Details Emerge on Harsh Methods at Guantánamo". Archives – 2005. The New York Times. Retrieved 2019-07-07.
  3. ^ "Rectal rehydration and waterboarding: the CIA torture report's grisliest findings". The Guardian. 13 March 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  4. ^ Laughland, Oliver (2015-05-20). "How the CIA tortured its detainees". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  5. ^ Prisoner Abuse Law & Legal Definition. USLegal. Retrieved from http://definitions.uslegal.com/p/prisoner-abuse/
  6. ^ "No Escape: Male Rape in U.S. Prisons". www.hrw.org.
  7. ^ Goodmark, Leigh; Flores, Juanita; Goldscheid, Julie; Ritchie, Andrea; SpearIt (2015-07-09). "Plenary 2 -- Redefining Gender Violence -- Transcripts from Converge! Reimagining the Movement to End Gender Violence". Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network. SSRN 2628984. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)

Further reading[edit]