Legality of Cannabis by U.S. Jurisdiction

Brad Little
Brad Little official photo.jpg
33rd Governor of Idaho
Assumed office
January 7, 2019
LieutenantJanice McGeachin
Preceded byButch Otter
42nd Lieutenant Governor of Idaho
In office
January 6, 2009 – January 7, 2019
GovernorButch Otter
Preceded byJim Risch
Succeeded byJanice McGeachin
Member of the Idaho Senate
In office
May 24, 2001 – January 6, 2009
Preceded byJudy Danielson
Succeeded byMelinda Smyser
Constituency8th district (2001–2002)
11th district (2002–2009)
Personal details
Born
Bradley Jay Little

(1954-02-15) February 15, 1954 (age 68)
Emmett, Idaho, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse
(m. 1978)
Children2
EducationUniversity of Idaho (BS)
Signature
WebsiteGovernment website Campaign website

Bradley Jay Little (born February 15, 1954) is an American politician serving as the 33rd governor of Idaho since January 2019. A member of the Republican Party, he served as the 42nd lieutenant governor of Idaho from 2009 to 2019. From 2001 to 2009, Little served in the Idaho Senate, where he chaired the majority caucus and represented the 8th and 11th legislative districts (change due to redistricting in 2002).[1] He won the 2018 gubernatorial election against Democratic nominee Paulette Jordan.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Little at his 2011 inauguration, with U.S. Senator Jim Risch and their wives

Little was born and raised in Emmett, Idaho and graduated from Emmett High School in 1972.[3] He attended the University of Idaho in Moscow,[4] was a member of the Idaho Alpha chapter of Phi Delta Theta fraternity,[5][6] and earned a B.S. in agribusiness in 1976.

Career[edit]

Little has had an extensive dual career tending to his family's ranching interests (his grandfather was the "Idaho Sheep King")[3] and in public service. During the 1981 and 1985 legislative sessions, Little represented his father, David Little, in the Senate on a temporary appointment due to illness, during which time he served on the Finance and Resources Committees.[7] Little also managed his family's ranching operation, Little Land and Livestock, for almost 30 years until his son, David, became manager in 2009 when Little was appointed lieutenant governor.[8] He continues to work as the head of Little Enterprises, Inc. (a diversified farming and cattle operation), and is a member of the board of directors of Performance Design Inc., a small Boise-based manufacturing company.[8]

Little has also been involved in a variety of private organizations and companies based in Idaho and the Mountain West. He is a former chairman of the Idaho Association of Commerce and Industry (IACI), "The Voice of Business in Idaho", and was a member of its board for 20 years (1981–2001).[9] Little is also the former vice-chairman of the Idaho Community Foundation and the Emmett Public School Foundation, and the former director of the Idaho Wool Growers Association and the University of Idaho Foundation.[8][10][11] He has also served in the past on the boards of directors of High Country News, Home Federal Bank, a small Idaho-based regional bank recently acquired by Bank of the Cascades, and the Idaho Foundation for Excellence in Education.[12][13]

State senator (2001–2009)[edit]

Governor Dirk Kempthorne appointed Little to fill a state senate vacancy in May 2001. He represented what was at the time District 8, which covered a part of Gem County surrounding and north of Emmett, all of Boise, Valley, and Adams Counties, and the southern portion of Idaho County.[14][15]

After a change in district boundaries due to redistricting in 2001–02, Little was elected in the fall of 2002 to District 11, which then encompassed all of Gem County and the northern portion of Canyon County, including the communities of Middleton and Parma.[16][17] He was reelected senator from the 11th legislative district four times.[18][19][20] Little was also elected in 2003 by his Republican peers to the party leadership position of Majority Caucus Chair, which he held until 2009.[21]

Committee assignments[edit]

  • Agricultural Affairs 2002
  • Resources and Environment 2002
  • State Affairs 2003–2009
  • Resources & Environment 2003–2009
  • Transportation 2003–2009
  • Economic Outlook
  • Revenue Assessment

State Senator from District 11: 2002 results[22][23]

Republican Party Votes Pct Republican Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 3,865 72.1 Mike Pullin 1,498 27.9
Republican Party Votes Pct Independent Votes Pct
Brad Little 8,478 76.2 John Steinebach 2,646 23.8

State Senator from District 11: 2004 results[24][25]

Republican Party Votes Pct Republican Party Votes Pct Republican Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 3,402 65.00 Steven Thayn 1,398 26.71 Walter Bayes 434 8.29
Republican Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 13,533 100.00

State Senate from District 11: 2006 results[26][27]

Republican Party Votes Pct Constitution Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 10,090 77.05 Jared Eastley 3,006 22.95

State Senate from District 11: 2008 results[28][29]

Republican Party Votes Pct Independent Votes Pct
Brad Little 14,870 77.5 Kirsten Faith Richardson 4,309 22.5

Lieutenant governor of Idaho (2009–2019)[edit]

Little presiding over the Idaho Senate in 2011

Appointment, election and reelection[edit]

In January 2009, Governor Butch Otter appointed Little to the office of lieutenant governor to fill the vacancy left by former Lieutenant Governor Jim Risch's election to the U.S. Senate in 2008. Little was sworn in by Otter on January 6, 2009, and confirmed by unanimous consent when the Idaho Senate convened on January 12.[30][31]

Little was elected lieutenant governor in 2010, defeating two opponents in the primary election and two opponents from the Democratic and Constitution parties in the general election.[32][33] He was reelected in 2014.

Lieutenant Governor of Idaho: 2010 results[34]
Republican Party Votes Pct Republican Party Votes Pct Republican Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 95,758 67.6 Joshua Blessinger 26,808 18.9 Steven Dana Pankey 19,096 13.5
Republican Party Votes Pct Democratic Party Votes Pct Constitution Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 299,979 67.8% Eldon Wallace 120,174 27.2% Paul Venable 22,007 5.0%
Lieutenant Governor of Idaho: 2014 results[35]
Republican Party Votes Pct Republican Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 96,780 66.8 Jim Chmelik 48,099 33.2
Republican Party Votes Pct Democratic Party Votes Pct Constitution Party Votes Pct
Brad Little 271,268 62.8% Bert Marley 141,917 32.9% David Hartigan 18,705 4.3%

Economic development and trade missions[edit]

Little focused on economic development as lieutenant governor, helping persuade energy bar producer Clif Bar to build a new food manufacturing plant in Idaho in 2013.[36][37]

Little also took part in and led several trade missions. He led a Friendship Mission to Basque Country in Spain in 2010, during which he met President of the Basque Government Patxi López. During this meeting, Little and López agreed to establish a Basque Economic Development Office in Boise that "would provide resources and services for Idaho and Basque companies to ease collaboration on research, sales and collaborative programs."[38] Little later signed the Euskadi-Idaho Friendship Agreement, which affirms the friendship and cultural affinity between the Basque Country and Idaho, which has the largest Basque community outside Spain.[39]

Little was also a member of a 2011 Idaho trade delegation that traveled to Mexico and Brazil.[40] After the trade mission, he said, "we found tremendous interest and opportunities in both countries for Idaho products and services … This trip strengthened key trade relationships and established new customers for Idaho businesses." The Idaho Department of Commerce estimated that the mission resulted in sales of more than $30 million.[41]

Legislation[edit]

In the 2014 legislative session, Little sponsored Senate Bill 1354, an anti-"patent troll" bill. The bill protects companies from abusive or "bad faith assertions of patent infringement" to collect an extortionate licensing fee.[42][43][44]

Governor of Idaho (2019–present)[edit]

2018 election[edit]

In June 2016, Little announced his candidacy for the Idaho gubernatorial election in 2018.[45][46] He said that Idaho National Laboratory would be a priority if he became governor.[47]

Little was endorsed by incumbent Governor Otter,[48] former governors Dirk Kempthorne and Phil Batt, and U.S. Senator Jim Risch.[49]

Little speaks during a meeting at the White House with President Trump and Vice President Pence and fellow governors-elect.

During his campaign, Little called for a phased-in $350 million reduction in the state income tax and the elimination of the Idaho grocery tax.[50]

Little won the Idaho Republican Party primary, beating both U.S. Representative Raúl Labrador and businessman Tommy Ahlquist with 37.3% of the vote.[51] In the general election in November, he defeated state Representative Paulette Jordan, the Idaho Democratic Party nominee,[52] by over 130,000 votes.

Tenure[edit]

In March 2020, Little gained attention for signing two bills into law that addressed transgender people.[53] The first bans transgender women and girls from competing in women's sports, citing possible unfair physical advantages. The second bill, HB 509, bans transgender people from changing the sex on their birth certificates.[54][55][56]

In 2021, Little signed legislation that raised signature requirements for ballot initiatives.[57] That year, he also signed legislation that would permit harvesting up to 90% of the state's estimated 1,500 wolves to the minimum level of 150 as set by Idaho’s wolf conservation and management plan; the legislation was backed by the ranching sector of Idaho as well as many in the hunting and fishing community, but strongly opposed by environmental advocates.[58]

Political positions[edit]

Abortion[edit]

In late April 2021, Little signed House Bill 366, effectively prohibiting abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy, making exceptions for victims of rape, incest, and for medical emergencies. He also said, "We should never relent in our efforts to protect the lives of the preborn" and "Hundreds and hundreds of babies lose their lives every year in Idaho due to abortion, an absolute tragedy."[59][60]

In March 2022, Little signed Senate Bill 1309 modeled after the Texas Heartbeat Act that prohibited abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy. The bill made exceptions for victims of rape, incest, and for medical emergencies.[61] The Idaho Supreme Court later temporarily blocked the law.[62]

Gun control[edit]

Little opposes gun control. In May 2021, he signed a bill that would thwart nearly a half-dozen of executive orders from President Joe Biden combating gun control.[63]

LGBT rights[edit]

Little opposes LGBT rights. In 2006, he voted to propose 2006 Idaho Amendment 2, which banned same-sex marriages or civil unions being performed in the state of Idaho. During his campaign for governor, Little said, "marriage is the union between a man and a woman".[64] In March 2020, he signed both House Bill 500 and House Bill 509, which ban transgender people who identify as female from playing on athletic teams that don't align with their sex-at-birth and ban transgender people from changing their gender mark on their birth certificate.[65]

Marijuana[edit]

In a January 2019 interview, Little expressed opposition to legalizing recreational marijuana. He had expressed skepticism about legalizing medical marijuana for patients.[66]

When being asked about marijuana legalization in April 2019, Little said: “If Idahoans want legal marijuana, they elected the wrong guy as governor.” NORML, a group advocating the legalization of marijuana, gave Little an F rating for his policies about reforming marijuana laws.[67][68]

In February 2021, Little signed Senate Bill 1017, which raises the legal THC limit in cannabidiol (CBD) products from 0% to 0.1% THC. The law went into effect on July 1, 2021.[69]

In April 2021, Little signed a bill that would legalize the cultivation and transportation of hemp in Idaho with up to 0.3% THC in it, making Idaho the final state to do so, but the bill would prohibit the sale of hemp products containing any THC.[70]

Electoral history[edit]

Idaho gubernatorial elections: 2018
Year Democratic Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
2018 Paulette Jordan 231,081 38.2% Brad Little 361,661 59.8% Bev "Angel" Boeck Libertarian 6,551 1.1% Walter L. Bayes Constitution 5,787 1.0%
Idaho Gubernatorial Republican primary election, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brad Little 72,518 37.3
Republican Raúl Labrador 63,460 32.6
Republican Tommy Ahlquist 50,977 26.2
Republican Lisa Marie 3,390 1.7
Republican Steve Pankey 2,701 1.4
Republican Harley Brown 874 0.4
Republican Dalton Cannady 528 0.3
Total votes 194,448 100.0
Idaho Gubernatorial Republican primary election, 2022
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brad Little (incumbent) 148,831 52.8
Republican Janice McGeachin 90,854 32.2
Republican Ed Humphreys 30,877 11.0
Republican Steve Bradshaw 5,470 1.9
Republican Ashley Jackson 3,172 1.1
Republican Lisa Marie 1,119 0.4
Republican Ben Cannady 804 0.3
Republican Cody Usabel 680 0.2
Total votes 281,807 100.0

Personal life[edit]

Little married Teresa Soulen of Weiser in May 1978, and they have two sons and five grandchildren.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Idaho's Lieutenant Governor". lgo.idaho.gov. 2018-05-14. Archived from the original on 2018-05-14. Retrieved 2018-07-09.
  2. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (2018-05-15). "Idaho Primary Election Results". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  3. ^ a b Shadduck, Louise (1990). Andy Little: Idaho Sheep King. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, Ltd. ISBN 0-87004-340-4.
  4. ^ "Students". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1973. p. 152.
  5. ^ "Phi Delta Theta". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1973. p. 234.
  6. ^ "Phi Delta Theta". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1974. p. 245.
  7. ^ "The Spokesman-Review - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d Brad Little for Idaho, "Meet Brad Little". Retrieved 2021-08-10.
  9. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-08-10. Retrieved 2014-07-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "Historical Board - Idaho Community Foundation". Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-07-30.
  11. ^ "Emmett Public School Foundation / Emmett Public School Foundation". Emmettschools.org. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Terms of Service Violation". Bloomberg.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  13. ^ "Ex-HCN board member named Idaho lt. guv". Hcn.org. 6 January 2009. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  14. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-07-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  15. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-07-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-07-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  17. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-07-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^ "2004 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-03.
  19. ^ "2006 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-03.
  20. ^ "2008 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-06-16. Retrieved 2017-05-03.
  21. ^ Brad Little for Idaho, "About Brad - Brad Little for Idaho - Campaign 2014". Archived from the original on 2014-06-28. Retrieved 2014-07-30.
  22. ^ "2002 Primary Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  23. ^ "2002 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  24. ^ "2004 Primary Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  25. ^ "2004 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  26. ^ "2006 Primary Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  27. ^ "2006 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  28. ^ "2008 Primary Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-05-01. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  29. ^ "2008 General Results legislative". Sos.idaho.gov. Archived from the original on 2012-06-16. Retrieved 2017-05-15.
  30. ^ KBOI 2, "Brad Little named Lieutenant Governor | News | Boise, Meridian, Nampa, Caldwell, Idaho News, Weather, Sports and Breaking News - KBOI 2". Archived from the original on 2015-02-24. Retrieved 2014-08-06.
  31. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2014-08-06.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  32. ^ "2010 Primary Results statewide". Archived from the original on 2013-07-07. Retrieved 2014-08-06.
  33. ^ "Election Center". Spokesman.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  34. ^ Election Division, Office of the Idaho Secretary of State, "2010 General Results statewide". Archived from the original on 2012-09-22. Retrieved 2012-10-06.
  35. ^ Election Division, Office of the Idaho Secretary of State, "Statewide Totals". Archived from the original on 2014-12-01. Retrieved 2017-04-24.
  36. ^ "Candidates for lieutenant governor differ on role | State Elections | Idahostatesman.com". www.idahostatesman.com. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2022.
  37. ^ "Idaho Officials Move at the Speed of Business". Bxjmag.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  38. ^ "Home - Idaho Freedom Foundation". idahoreporter.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  39. ^ Cenarrusa Foundation for Basque Culture, "Cenarrusa Foundation for Basque Culture | Roy Eiguren, Idaho attorney and lobbyist". Archived from the original on 2014-08-19. Retrieved 2014-08-14.
  40. ^ "Idaho Trade Mission Results In Promising Leads". Opb.org. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  41. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-05-02. Retrieved 2014-08-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  42. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-08-19. Retrieved 2014-08-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  43. ^ Lombardo, Amy; Little, Brad (21 March 2014). "'Patent Troll' bill will protect Idaho businesses". Idahobusinessreview.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  44. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-07-08. Retrieved 2014-08-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  45. ^ "Brad Little, Idaho's governor-in-waiting, commits to 2018 run". idahostatesman. Retrieved 2017-04-10.
  46. ^ "Lt.Gov. Brad Little raises $340,000 for Idaho governor's race in 2018". idahostatesman. Retrieved 2017-04-10.
  47. ^ "Little says INL would be priority". Post Register. 2017-04-22. Retrieved 2017-04-24.
  48. ^ "Gov. Otter officially endorses Brad Little for governor | Community". Idahostatejournal.com. 2018-04-10. Retrieved 2018-05-14.
  49. ^ Category: politics (2018-05-06). "Little gubernatorial campaign announces endorsements". Idahopoliticsweekly.com. Retrieved 2018-05-14.
  50. ^ "Little on taxes: 'I've got a concrete plan because I've been here, I've listened'". Spokesman.com. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  51. ^ "Statewide Totals". sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-19.
  52. ^ "Report Declaration". sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-19.
  53. ^ "Idaho Governor Brad Little Signs Anti-Transgender Legislation".
  54. ^ "Idaho is actually arguing that its hateful birth certificate law isn't transphobic". 20 May 2020.
  55. ^ Rose, Andy; Silverman, Hollie. "Idaho Governor Signs Two Bills that Limit the Rights of Transgender People". CNN.com. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  56. ^ "Idaho Governor Signs Into Law Anti-Transgender Legislation". NBCNews.com. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  57. ^ Epstein, Reid J.; Corasaniti, Nick (2021-05-22). "Republicans Move to Limit a Grass-Roots Tradition of Direct Democracy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-05-25.
  58. ^ "Bill to kill up to 90% of Idaho wolves signed by governor". ABC News. Retrieved 2021-05-31.
  59. ^ Caroline Kelly. "Idaho GOP governor signs 'heartbeat' abortion ban into law". CNN. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  60. ^ "Gov. Little signs 'fetal heartbeat' abortion ban bill into law". ktvb.com. April 27, 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  61. ^ Moseley-Morris, Kelcie (2022-03-23). "Idaho governor signs bill effectively banning most abortions". Idaho Capital Sun. Retrieved 2022-04-21.
  62. ^ "Idaho Supreme Court temporarily blocks new ban on abortions after six weeks". USA Today. Retrieved 2022-04-21.
  63. ^ "Idaho governor signs bill to halt Biden moves on gun laws". AP NEWS. 2021-05-11. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  64. ^ "Brad Little on Civil Rights". www.ontheissues.org. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  65. ^ "Gov. Little defends two anti-transgender bills he signed into Idaho law". ktvb.com. April 8, 2020. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  66. ^ Duke, Emily. "Gov. Little talks medical marijuana, possible routes to legalization". www.kmvt.com. Retrieved 2021-11-01.
  67. ^ Russell, Betsy Z. "Little: If Idahoans want legal marijuana, 'They elected wrong guy as governor'". Idaho Press. Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  68. ^ "Idaho". NORML. Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  69. ^ "SENATE BILL 1017 – Idaho State Legislature". Retrieved 2021-11-02.
  70. ^ "Idaho Gov. signs bill allowing growing, transport of hemp". AP NEWS. 2021-04-19. Retrieved 2021-11-02.

External links[edit]

Idaho Senate
Preceded by
Judy Danielson
Member of the Idaho Senate
from the 8th district

2001–2002
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the Idaho Senate
from the 11th district

2002–2009
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Lieutenant Governor of Idaho
2009–2019
Succeeded by
Preceded by Governor of Idaho
2019–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by Republican nominee for Governor of Idaho
2018, 2022
Most recent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded byas Vice President Order of precedence of the United States
Within Idaho
Succeeded by
Mayor of city
in which event is held
Succeeded by
Preceded byas Governor of Washington Order of precedence of the United States
Outside Idaho
Succeeded byas Governor of Wyoming