South Fulton, Georgia
Location in Fulton County and the state of Georgia
Location in Fulton County and the state of Georgia
South Fulton is located in Metro Atlanta
South Fulton
South Fulton
Location of South Fulton in Metro Atlanta
Coordinates: 33°35′33″N 84°40′23″W / 33.5925899°N 84.6729381°W / 33.5925899; -84.6729381Coordinates: 33°35′33″N 84°40′23″W / 33.5925899°N 84.6729381°W / 33.5925899; -84.6729381
CountryUnited States
StateGeorgia
CountyFulton
CityhoodMay 1, 2017
Area
 • Total85.79 sq mi (222.20 km2)
 • Land84.79 sq mi (219.61 km2)
 • Water1.00 sq mi (2.59 km2)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total3,115
 • Estimate 
(2019)[2]
99,155
 • Density1,147.27/sq mi (442.96/km2)
 • Density1,111.14/sq mi (429.01/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
FIPS code13-72122
Websitecityofsouthfultonga.gov

South Fulton is a city in Fulton County, Georgia, United States. It includes all of the land that had remained unincorporated in southwest Fulton County with the exception of the Fulton Industrial Boulevard corridor.[3] The communities of Red Oak, Cooks Crossing, Stonewall Tell, Fife, (part of) Campbellton, Ben Hill, Sandtown, Cliftondale, and Peters Woods (a few of which were towns founded before the American Civil War) are located in South Fulton.[4] It has a population of 99,155[2] and an area of 85.64 square miles (221.8 km2).[5]

The first mayor of South Fulton is Bill Edwards, who previously served on the Fulton County Board of Commissioners from 2000 to 2014.[6] His term expires on December 31, 2021.[7]

History[edit]

In 2007, the region voted in a referendum 85% against forming a municipality.[8] In the Georgia State Senate, Kasim Reed sponsored the legislation authorizing the referendum.[9]

The 2016 Georgia General Assembly passed bill HB514 to incorporate South Fulton, which received the signature of Governor Nathan Deal on April 29, 2016. On November 8, 59% of the citizens of South Fulton voted to become a chartered city. In early 2017, South Fulton held elections on March 21, followed by runoff elections before incorporation took effect on May 1.[10]

This referendum, like the one before it, was part of a "cityhood movement" in the Atlanta metropolitan area that began with the incorporation of Sandy Springs in 2005, on the opposite side of Atlanta, with several other communities in Fulton voting to incorporate in 2007.[11] With the passage of the South Fulton referendum in 2016, Fulton County became the first county in Georgia with no unincorporated residential areas.[12] As a result, in 2017 Fulton County also became the first county in Georgia to cease providing municipal services such as fire, police, zoning, and code enforcement.[13] Many former Fulton County personnel and facilities were transferred to the City of South Fulton.[13]

In November 2017, after a one-year waiting period mandated by state law, the city council selected Renaissance as the new name for the city, also having considered Campbellton (a historic town now partly within the city), Atlanta Heights, Wolf Creek and retaining South Fulton among a total of 20 names out of 250 suggested by the public. Following a three-week public notice period and two regular public meetings, which are required to amend the city charter,[14] the city council approved the name change in December 2017. However, Mayor Edwards vetoed the name change on December 18, citing several reasons including contracts and some public opposition.[15]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
Est. 201999,155[2]
U.S. Decennial Census[16]

South Fulton's population as of 2019 is estimated to be 99,155.[2] In 2010, prior to incorporation, the United States Census Bureau estimates that the area now within South Fulton's boundaries was home to 85,769 people.[2]

More than 90% of South Fulton residents are African Americans.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Feb 12, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "City and Town Population Totals: 2010-2019". Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  3. ^ "City of South Fulton with Proposed Council Districts" (PDF). Gis.fultoncountyga.gov. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  4. ^ VICE News (2018-09-07), Eight Black Women Run This City's Entire Justice System (HBO), retrieved 2018-09-07
  5. ^ "Destination South Fulton | South Fulton, GA". www.cityofsouthfultonga.gov. Retrieved 2019-06-04.
  6. ^ "Meet the Mayor". South Fulton, GA. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  7. ^ Arielle Kass (2019-12-17). "South Fulton Mayor Bill Edwards could be removed from office". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 2020-02-15. Edwards’ term expires Dec. 31, 2021.
  8. ^ "Senate Committee Mulls South Fulton Cityhood Bill". 90.1 FM WABE. 2014-03-05. Retrieved 2020-02-15. In 2007, 85 percent of voters said “No” to a similar referendum.
  9. ^ Senate State and Local Governmental Operations Committee (2007). "Local Bills" (PDF). Retrieved 2020-02-15. HB 725 - South Fulton, City of; territory description; change provisions / Reed (35th) / DO PASS BY AMENDMENT
  10. ^ "SOUTH FULTON CITYHOOD TRANSITION : TOP 10 FAQS" (PDF). Fultoncountyga.gov. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  11. ^ Sam Rosen (April 2017). "Atlanta's Controversial 'Cityhood' Movement". The Atlantic. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  12. ^ Dave Williams (2016-10-07). "Fulton could be first fully incorporated county in Georgia". Atlanta Business Chronicle. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  13. ^ a b Arielle Kass (2017-07-03). "Fulton County first in Georgia to relinquish city services". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  14. ^ Cochran, Noreen. "South Fulton votes to become Renaissance, Georgia". Mdjonline.com. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  15. ^ "South Fulton mayor vetos town changing name to 'Renaissance'". Fox5atlanta.com. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  16. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.

External links[edit]