Beilby Medal and Prize

Beilby Medal and Prize
Awarded forWork of exceptional practical significance in chemical engineering, applied materials science, energy efficiency or a related field.
Sponsored byRoyal Society of Chemistry
Date1924 (1924)
Reward(s)£1,000
Websitewww.rsc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Awards/Beilby/

The Beilby Medal and Prize is awarded annually to a scientist or engineer for work that has exceptional practical significance in chemical engineering, applied materials science, energy efficiency or a related field.[1][2][3] The prize is jointly administered by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Society of Chemical Industry, who make the award in rotation.

The award is open to members of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Society of Chemical Industry as well as other scientists and engineers worldwide. The aim of the award is to recognise the achievements of early-career scientists, and nominees should be no older than 39 years of age.[2]

The Beilby Medal and Prize is awarded in memory of Scottish scientist Sir George Thomas Beilby FRS. Born in 1850, he joined the Oakbank Oil Company in 1869 following his studies at the University of Edinburgh. He later became President of all three organisations or their precursor societies, acting as President of the Society of Chemical Industry from 1898–99, The Institute of Chemistry from 1902–12 and the Institute of Metals from 1916-18.[1][2][3]

Recipients of the award receive a medal, a certificate and a prize of £1,000. The first award was made in 1930.[1]

Recipients[edit]

The Beilby Medal and Prize recipients since 1930 are:[1][2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Beilby Medal and Prize". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d "Beilby Medal and Prize". Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  3. ^ a b c "Beilby Medal and Prize". Society of Chemical Industry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  4. ^ "Beilby Medal and Prize". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  5. ^ "Beilby Medal and Prize". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Beilby Medal and Prize". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  7. ^ "Beilby Medal and Prize 2014 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  8. ^ "2013 Beilby Medal and Prize Awarded to Prof Xiangfeng Duan". Society of Chemical Industry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  9. ^ "Beilby Medal and Prize 2012 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  10. ^ "Microwave expert Samuel Kingman awarded Beilby Medal and Prize". Society of Chemical Industry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  11. ^ "Biological aerosol work wins Beilby Medal". Society of Chemical Industry. Retrieved 12 January 2015.